It’s Time to Eat Real: Food Day 2011


Today is Food Day, an event that seeks to bring Americans together to push for healthy, affordable food produced in a sustainable, humane way. Ultimately, the organization aims to transform the American diet.

Today, thousands of people are gathering in schools, college campuses, farmers markets, City Halls, and state capitals to talk about what’s right and wrong with our diets and the whole food system–and how to fix them.

Why eat real?

Real food tastes better. And meals built around vegetables, fruits, and whole grains are delicious and satisfying. According to FoodDay.org, “far too many Americans are eating diets composed of salty, overly processed packaged foods clad in cardboard and plastic; high-calorie sugary drinks that pack on pounds and rot teeth, but have no nutritional benefit; and fast-food meals made of white bread, fatty grain-fed factory-farmed meat, French fries, and more soda still. What we eat should be bolstering our health, but it’s actually contributing to several hundred thousand premature deaths from heart attack, stroke, diabetes, and cancer each year. What’s more, the way our food is produced all too often harmful to farm workers, the environment, and farm animals.”

Food Day is based on these six principles:

What’s happening on Food Day in your community?

Advertisements

3 responses to “It’s Time to Eat Real: Food Day 2011

  1. I attended an interesting lecture about marketing, policy, and kids in the frame of “new media.” One aspect I had not considered was adolescents– we often talk about younger children because there is the science to support their inability to actually understand that marketing is advertising and a sense that innocence should be protected– but rarely consider whether a 15 year old also deserves extra clarity in marketing as it evolves to encompass social networks and more. They definitely need help in the preventing chronic nutrition-related illnesses!

  2. (^ and in the blogging world, I talked about transit and food access.)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s